“Landvermesser.tv” is Map-based Storytelling

Monday, 21 July 2008

n-tv berichtet über eine Kulturprojekt, das im Juli 2008 in Berlin startet:

„Wir haben uns alle mit Literatur, Websites und Geotags beschäftigt und wollten das verschmelzen“, erklärt Tatjana Brode, die neben Jens Krisinger und Mathias Ott zu den Initiatoren des Projektes gehört. Kartenbasiertes Erzählen bedeute bislang meist, zweckorientierte oder historische Informationen zu verorten, so Brode weiter. „Uns war es wichtig, die Eindrücke der Stadt um eine fiktionale Komponente zu erweitern und ihnen eine literarische Bedeutung zu geben. Deshalb haben wir auf den Spaziergängen versucht, den Autoren ihre Geschichten zu entlocken und die Stadt als Buch zu öffnen.“

Quelle: http://www.n-tv.de/995043.html

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Ushahidi maps violence in Kenya

Thursday, 15 May 2008

Ushahidi

About

Ushahidi.com is a tool for people who witness acts of violence in Kenya in these post-election times. You can report the incident that you have seen, and it will appear on a map-based view for others to see. We are working with local Kenyan NGO’s to get information and to verify each incident.

What you can do is get the word out about Ushahidi so that it’s utilized to it’s full potential. This especially extends to talking to the people that you know who have seen things in Kenya and getting them to the site as well. You can also help by using the contact form to volunteer to help with the tracking and verifying of each incident.”

http://www.ushahidi.com/about.asp

Erik Hersman presented the project at Where 2.0


VC for Geoweb available

Thursday, 15 May 2008

“Location-based services and the geoweb, in confluence with social media, are hot areas of interest for venture investors.” Dev Khare, Venlock, was looking for projects at Where 2.0

http://www.slideshare.net/dkman/emerging-opportunities-on-the-geoweb/


Geographic News Filter “EveryBlock”

Wednesday, 14 May 2008

EveryBlock

“‘What’s happening in my neighborhood?’

For a long time, that’s been a tough question to answer. In dense, bustling cities like Chicago, New York and San Francisco, the number of daily media reports, government proceedings and local Internet conversations is staggering. Every day, a wealth of local information is created — officials inspect restaurants, journalists cover fires and Web users post photographs — but who has time to sort through all of that?

Our mission at EveryBlock is to solve that problem. We aim to collect all of the news and civic goings-on that have happened recently in your city, and make it simple for you to keep track of news in particular areas. We’re a geographic filter — a “news feed” for your neighborhood, or, yes, even your block.

At this time, we cover three American cities: Chicago, New York and San Francisco. On each site, you can type in any address to read local news and public information near you. You’ll find three main types of news:

  • Civic information — building permits, crimes, restaurant inspections and more. In many cases, this information is already on the Web but is buried in hard-to-find government databases. In other cases, this information has never been posted online, and we’ve forged relationships with governments to make it available.
  • News articles and blog entries — major newspapers, community weeklies, TV and radio news stations, local specialty publications and local blogs. We do the work of classifying articles by geography, so you can easily find the mainstream media coverage near particular locations.
  • Fun from across the Web — local photos posted to the Flickr photo-sharing site, user reviews of local businesses on Yelp, lost and found postings from Craigslist and more. We figure out the relevant places and point you to location-specific items you might not have known about.

We like to toss around the word “news” to describe all of this, and that might surprise you at first. Isn’t news what appears on the front page of the New York Times? Isn’t news something produced by professional journalists?

Well, it can be — and we include as much of that on EveryBlock as possible. But, in our minds, “news” at the neighborhood or block level means a lot more. On EveryBlock, “Somebody reviewed the new Italian restaurant down the street on Yelp” is news. “Somebody took a photo of that cool house on your block and posted it to Flickr” is news. “The NYPD posted its weekly crime report for your neighborhood” is news. If it’s in your neighborhood and it happened recently, it’s news on EveryBlock.”

http://www.everyblock.com/about/

More: Where 2.0 News Coverage


Locative Journalism

Sunday, 11 May 2008

LoJo

What is LoJo?
Shorthand for locative journalism, LoJo is the name of a project launched by a team of Northwestern University graduate students to study the intersection of journalism and emerging location-based technologies. Through this project, we hope to create interactive and informative mobile experiences that push innovation in journalism.


What is locative storytelling?

Using the bouquet of emerging mobile and location-based technologies (from GPS-enabled mobile phones to interactive online maps), locative storytelling provides multi-media content that enhances a user’s connection to a given place. At its best, this kind of interactive media gives users increased entry points, and more control over, any given story, thereby enabling deeper and more vibrant experiences.


What are some examples?

If you’ve ever been on an audio tour of a museum or a city neighborhood, you’ve experienced locative storytelling. Other examples include Google mash-ups (user-enhanced Google maps that layer location-specific information over area maps) and GPS-based mobile games.

http://lojoconnect.com/about-lojo/



Electric GPS Tour Car

Wednesday, 2 April 2008

2008-03-29_electric-time-car-rentals_small.jpg

“Come in and try our new GPS based audio tours which will guide you through the streets of San Francisco . With the option of taking three different routes you can discover popular attractions like the Golden Gate Bridge, Lombard Street and some other hidden treasures of our beautiful city such as the Japanese Tea Garden and the Painted Ladies. Along with driving directions, our GPS technology will also offer you music, sound effects, and historical background on the sites.”

Electric Time Car Rentals


Cabspotting

Wednesday, 2 April 2008

About This Video
“One Yellow Cab in San Francisco followed for 3 days using GPS data provided by cabspotting.org

An applet: http://www.mangtronix.com/cabspotting/cablet/