Southampton’s Hidden Histories – Locative FM

Saturday, 29 March 2008

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Hidden Histories of Southampton” is a oral history project using sort of a “Locative FM”. The project was launched on 14 March 2008. The press release:

Discover Southampton’s Hidden Histories

Southampton’s fascinating history is to be uncovered for all to hear as the revolutionary new concept of Street Radio comes to the city.

A unique street radio system, will be used across an exciting new heritage trail called Hidden Histories, which will be launched in Central Southampton on March 14 in the run up to Southampton ShowsOff, which is running throughout the weekend to show case Southampton’s creativity, talent and culture.

Street Radio is a new way of experiencing the city. The system utilises wireless communication technologies such as WIFI and Bluetooth in combination with FM radio to create captive ‘puddles’ where particular stories and themes can be heard.

By broadcasting using very weak radio transmitters a selection of stories from the Oral History Unit can be heard along 10 nodal points in the city where byte-sized stories are transmitted. These nodes link together to form a media rich walk that transports people through the changing life of the city.

“Hidden Histories makes accessible some of the highs and lows of Southampton’s 20th Century history, the glory of great ships and journeys as well as the disasters and long forgotten tales,” said Arts and Heritage Manager, Janet Owen.

The walk begins in and around the proposed ‘Cultural Quarter’ on Above Bar Street and the Civic Centre complex. And you can experience the walk 24 hours a day, seven days a week through any FM radio receiver or Bluetooth enabled mobile phone.

Route maps and radio units can be hired from Southampton’s Tourist Information Centre and more information can be found at http://www.hiddenhistories.org.uk

Cabinet member for Leisure and Neighbourhoods, Councillor Derek Burke, said: “This is a fantastic opportunity for people to enjoy Southampton’s history in a completely new and stimulating way using the latest technology.”

The Solent Centre for Architecture + Design, in partnership with London based media art innovators Hive Networks and artist Armin Medosch, have been working with Southampton City Council’s Oral History Unit on this unique project.”

http://www.hiddenhistories.org.uk/?id=hiddenhistoriespress

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“Plazemarks” – Mobile Tagging at Berlin

Saturday, 22 March 2008

A 2006 project by the Berliner artist Aram Bartholl (http://www.datenform.de/vitaeng.html):

“To make the digital layer of plazes visible in the city a selected number of plazes in Berlin got marked by interactive tags on the sidewalk. Each of these Plazemarks are individual icons but they all share the same graphical language. Each Plazemark has the Webadress of the specific plaze of Plazes.com encrypted. The technology behind these icons is called “Shotcode”. By using a standard mobile phone it is possible to decode the encrypted ink and browse to the specific plaze. A small java application decodes the tag from a picture taken by the phone’s camera.”

http://www.datenform.de/plazemarkeng.html

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Def.: GPS Drawing

Wednesday, 9 January 2008

Wikipedia says a bit: “GPS Drawing combines art, travelling (walking, flying and driving) and technology and is a method of drawing that uses GPS to create large-scale artwork.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=GPS_drawing&oldid=175734412


GPS Drawings: “Message in a Bottle” (2004ff.)

Wednesday, 9 January 2008

Layla Curtis - Message in a bottle

About the project:

“On 25th May 2004, fifty bottles containing messages were released into the sea off the south-east coast of England near Ramsgate Maritime Museum, Kent. The intended destination of the bottles is The Chatham Islands in the South Pacific Ocean. The islands, which are 800km east of mainland New Zealand, are the nearest inhabited land to the precise location on the opposite side of the world to Ramsgate Maritime Museum. It is anticipated that the bottles may be found several times before reaching the Chatham Islands.

Several of the bottles are being tracked using GPS technology and are programmed to send their longitude and latitude coordinates back to Ramsgate every hour. The information they transmit is used to create a real time drawing of their progress.”

http://www.laylacurtis.com/bottle/home.htm
Via Pasta&Vinegar


Loca: Set To Discoverable (2006ff.)

Sunday, 6 January 2008


(Film: Drew Hemment, 2007)

About: “Loca is an artist-led project on grass-roots, pervasive surveillance by John Evans (UK/Finland), Drew Hemment (UK), Theo Humphries (UK), Mike Raento (Finland).”

History: ” The premier full presentation of Loca: Set To Discoverable at ISEA2006 and ZeroOne in August 2006 combined art installation, software engineering, activism, pervasive design, hardware hacking, SMS poetry, sticker art and ambient performance.”

Setting: “Deploying a cluster of interconnected, self-sufficient Bluetooth nodes across downtown San Jose, the Loca art group were able to track and communicate with the residents of San Jose via their cellphone without their permission or knowledge, so long as they had a Bluetooth device set to discoverable. Over 7 days more than two thousand five hundred people were detected more than half a million (500,000) times by the Loca node network, enabling the team to build up a detailed picture of their movements. People were sent messages from a stranger with intimate knowledge of their movements. Over the course of the week the tone of the messages changed, “coffee later?” changing to “r u ignoring me?”

Why? “Pervasive surveillance is potentially both sinister and positive at the same time. New ways of organising media and of communicating with each other become possible when the context of the media and the user is known. But also as a consequence ever more can be surveilled and ultimately controlled. Loca examines what happens when it is easy for everyone to track everyone, when surveillance can be affected by consumer level technology within peer-to-peer networks, without collapsing this ambiguity. It is an experiment that does not either blindly celebrate the technology, or claim that the technology is inherently bad. It aims to raise awareness of the networks we inhabit, to provoke people into questioning them, and help people equip themselves to deal with the ambiguity of pervasive media environments.”

http://www.loca-lab.org/


“The Mobile City” conference 2008 at Rotterdam

Thursday, 20 December 2007

The Mobile City

“The Mobile City is a conference on locative and mobile media and the city. The conference brings together academics, urban professionals, locative artists, and media designers.

The rise of mobile and locative media like the mobile phone and GPS blur the boundaries between the physical world and the digital world. What does this mean for the city?”

Rotterdam, 27-28 February 2008

http://www.themobilecity.nl/


Will mscapers wear data gloves?

Sunday, 9 December 2007

Among the people at mscapeFest07 at Bristol were:

  • Yolande Kolstee, she is an officer for Innovation and Quality Care of the Royal Academy of Art (Koninklijke Academie van Beeldende Kunsten, abbreviated KABK), The Hague, Netherlands, and projectleader of the AR+RFID Lab at Royal Academy of Art. She works closely together with

Yolande and Pieter are working with RFID technology already and now are thinking of using the data gloves of their augmented reality systems as another sensor for the mscape system. What their students are doing you can watch in the following two funny videos from the website of AR+RFID Lab via YouTube.
The English website of the AR+RFID lab is: www.kabk.nl/lab